Appendix I – the Solution to the High Risk Jurisdiction Quandary?

With the further amendment to Appendix I announced by the GFSC this week, I thought I would take a look at the introduction of this Appendix and see if it fulfils the aims articulated when first mooted and the level of assistance it provides to firms in identifying high risk countries.

The idea of the addition to the AML/CFT Handbook of an Appendix which sets out a list of jurisdictions assessed by various respected organisations as high risk was initially welcomed by compliance professionals as it presented a short cut to their identification. However, there are hidden issues with these Appendices* that practitioners need to be wary of: something that we discussed in some detail at the Handbook Review Group when first proposed by the GFSC.

I joined the Group when it was established in 2013 and left shortly before the first draft of the Handbook was issued (as I had just set up Triangle Compliance Services and consultants were not allowed to be part of the Group). During my membership, we had several debates on the continuing use of Appendix C and whether to introduce an equivalent of Jersey’s Appendix D2. Some of us were sceptical of the idea of the high risk list based on our collective experience of the complacent way some firms risk assessed business relationships with a key principal connected to an Appendix C country. I certainly felt those issues could be repeated in the use of any high risk list without suitable caveats in place.

In order to appreciate that concern, we need to look at the purpose of Appendix C. This Appendix provides a list of countries in which the GFSC considers financial services businesses have “in place standards to combat ML and FT consistent with the FATF Recommendations and where such businesses are appropriately supervised for compliance with those requirements.” This list, which has been around for many years, was considered of assistance to firms because it meant that they did not have to identify such countries themselves but could rely on this list. However, there was a catch.

Not only did it state in Appendix C that “it does not provide assurance that a particular overseas business is subject to that legislation, or that it has implemented the necessary measures to ensure compliance with that legislation”, Section 9.6 of the Handbook goes further. It says “The inclusion of a country or territory in Appendix C does not mean that the country or territory in question is intrinsically low risk, nor does it mean that any business relationship or occasional transaction in which the customer or beneficial owner has a connection to such a country is to be automatically treated as a low risk relationship.”

The completion in full of the relationship risk assessment is still required when Appendix C firms are involved in a business relationship.

The concerns over a list of such countries was that it presented the same risk of complacency: a risk some of us felt would be best avoided or at least mitigated. No doubt with that in mind, in June 2020, the GFSC amended the new AML/CFT Handbook and Appendix I was born.

The previous GFSC approach had been to issue Instructions and Business from Sensitive Sources Notices highlighting the thrice yearly FATF statements on the assessments of jurisdictions with weak measures to combat money laundering and terrorist financing. The new Appendix I was to replace such Notices and Instructions as well as provide the information collated by the GFSC on high risk countries.

As the titles suggest, Jersey’s Appendix D 1 and Guernsey’s Appendix H include high risk jurisdictions subject to a call for action by the FATF. However, Guernsey’s Appendix H reminds us of Paragraph 5(1)(c)(i) of Schedule 3 which confirms when a firm shall apply ECDD measures to a business relationship or occasional transaction. This is when the customer or beneficial owner has a relevant connection with a country or territory that –

“(A) provides funding or support for terrorist activities, or does not apply (or insufficiently applies) the FATF Recommendations, or
(B) is a country otherwise identified by the FATF as a country for which such measures are appropriate.”

As Appendix H only identifies those countries and territories in relation to which the FATF has listed as high risk, Appendix I is a useful reference point to identify other countries such as those which fund or support terrorism. However, it is only Jersey that includes Iran and North Korea in their Appendix D2 – an important oversight and worthy to note even if ECDD will apply to these two countries in any event.

As for Appendix I, this includes countries that a variety of groups have identified as presenting certain ML and/or FT risks. Both Crown Dependencies set out the results of assessments of countries by FATF, the OECD, Transparency International, the World Bank, the US government and a US think-tank: Fund for Peace/ Foreign Policy magazine. Interestingly, there are three sources included in Guernsey’s Appendix I which are not in Jersey’s Appendix D2 and vice versa. Not unexpectedly, given these differences, there are countries on the Guernsey list which are not on the Jersey list and vice versa which, in my view, shows that these assessments are still subjective and caution is needed.

Whilst Guernsey and Jersey’s Financial Services Commissions state clearly that they do not accept responsibility for the findings and conclusions of these sources, they differ in the explanation of their list’s purpose. Guernsey explains that it “does not automatically imply that a business relationship or occasional transaction with a relevant connection to a country or territory on Appendix I is high risk, as the firm can continue to take a risk-based decision on the level of overall risk within a business relationship”. Jersey states “Relevant persons are expected to exercise judgement in relation to how they interpret and use these sources and to reach their own conclusions on risk.” I prefer the language used by Jersey as it more directly reflects the need for caution over the content of the list – or more importantly its omissions.

And that goes to the heart of the concern – if a country is not on the list it does not mean it is not high risk.

So, whether it is a solution to the high risk jurisdiction quandary or simply a helpful tool, it does depend on the way the lists are treated. Ultimately though, the importance of assessing the country is not just about whether it appears on this list but also taking into account all the other factors that make up a business relationship.




*Appendix I – Countries and territories identified as presenting higher risks” and “Appendix H – FATF High Risk Jurisdictions Subject to a Call for Action”