The Politics of Compliance

tindalldawn-1-e1454075780950Sitting here, as proud as punch to be elected as a Deputy and member of Guernsey’s States of Deliberation, the mind starts thinking of the compliance aspects of our success at the polls.

My first thought is AML – of course!  High risk I may be but am I a PEP?  Does the automatic requirement for enhanced due diligence apply to me because I am a Deputy?

For those of you who don’t know PEP stands for politically exposed person. The definition, which is the same in both sets of Regulations that apply in Guernsey, starts by saying that a politically exposed person means “a person who has, or has had at any time, a prominent public function or who has been elected or appointed to such a function in a country or territory other than the Bailiwick …” (My emphasis)

So, having read that, I see that it’s not me then ?  ….. Oh yes it is! Because, as always, it is never as simple as it seems.

As I have been elected to a political position in the Bailiwick, I am considered a “domestic” PEP and the extra due diligence does not automatically apply here.   However, if I want to open a bank account, say, in the UK, I am a “non-domestic” PEP and so caught by their Money Laundering Regulations 2007.  Their Regulation 14(5)(a)(i) states that a PEP “is an individual who is or has, at any time in the preceding year, been entrusted with a prominent public function by ..  a state other than the United Kingdom”.

As we have many banks here that are branches of UK banks or, indeed, branches of other countries’ banks, their approach needs to be considered.  Their policies and procedures may require that the highest standard of AML which applies in the jurisdictions in which they operate is followed or they may not even differentiate between “domestic” and “non-domestic” PEP.   So whilst we are not caught by the legislation which applies to those branches, which is the Guernsey legislation, we are probably caught by the policies imposed on them by “head office”.

As Guernsey intends to update its legislation and the Handbooks to follow the FATF (Financial Action Task Force) Recommendations 2012, that distinction should no longer be as relevant and I will have PEP status both here and abroad … but not yet.

Whether or not we are automatically PEPs does not mean the story ends there.  As I have said, it is highly likely that, if we are not treated as PEPs, the business relationships or occasional transactions we undertake will be assessed as high risk anyway under the firm’s policy and procedures.

However, whilst the definition of PEP in legislation invariably includes the PEP’s immediate family and close associates as it does in Guernsey, what is interesting to note is that the FATF Recommendations do not call these people PEPs.  All that the Recommendations state is that “the requirements for all types of PEP should also apply to family members or close associates of such PEPs.” (My emphasis again).

So whatever you want to call us, come Tuesday, I expect businesses to be queuing up at the doors of new Deputies’ for those extra pieces of information or documentation to comply with the Handbooks.

If you have not checked (or had not even thought to check) your database to see if we (or our family members or close associates) are your clients, then may I politely suggest you contact me.  I can help you review your procedures to make sure you don’t miss anyone’s change of status which results in the need to undertake further enhanced due diligence.

The Finance Industry – Confidence in Money?

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As you know, I have been out canvassing and talking to people about the future of Guernsey. During these chats I have been hit by one particular message – a lack of confidence.  This is not just in the finance sector but in most aspects of life.  Whilst this is disappointing, it is not that surprising and something clearly needs to be done.

An upturn in the world economy will, of course, increase confidence as perhaps will a new set of Deputies but what can be done about confidence in the finance industry?

James Madison, Jr., the fourth President of the United States and political theorist, once said “the circulation of confidence is better than the circulation of money” – however in our industry we need both.

Diversification is at the top of most people’s agenda – we’ve seen the introduction of an aircraft registry and image rights legislation.  Also, the Digital Greenhouse, in my view, is a beacon of light for innovation having hosted some fascinating discussions on how we can promote Guernsey.

William Mason, Director General of the Guernsey Financial Services Commission, in his speech to the Industry in November 2015, having analysed other financial centres, concluded “that we match the most competitive countries in a large number of areas and that we still possess many key success factors.”  I agree.

Having worked in the Fiduciary sector, I was also pleased to see KPMG’s Strategic Review of the Guernsey fiduciary industry which confirms that “[t]he fiduciary industry is a material contributor to the local economy and island.” However, as my interest is in the AML/CFT perspective, the report discusses the need to investigate centralising and streamlining the CDD and KYC processes for on-boarding of clients across Guernsey.  KPMG concluded that “any opportunity to make this easier from a client perspective would be welcomed.”  I think this is really important although, in my view, if we can get clients and certifiers to follow the certification instructions first time it would be a massive bonus.

The Report goes on to say “[m]eeting these challenges will require clear direction and monitoring”.  Direction can come from a variety of sources: the Board, the management, the customers and the politicians and our regulator.

If elected, I hope to be one of those politicians providing clear direction and monitoring to increase the circulation of both confidence and money.

It’s Election Time in Guernsey

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IT’S ELECTION TIME!

For those of you who haven’t noticed, I have registered to stand for election as People’s Deputy in St Peter Port South.

As not all of you are interested in politics or, indeed, registered to vote, I won’t bore you with my policies – for those who are interested my website is http://www.dawntindall.gg.

Suffice is to say, it has been my ambition to be a politician since I was 6 when my Mother got me leafleting for a candidate standing for the then Liberal Party in the UK.  Having studied politics then law and, more importantly, moved to Guernsey, I am now in a position to fulfill that ambition.  I am very much looking forward to canvassing, meeting new people and listening to their views and, perhaps if I am truly lucky, even be elected!

One message I would like to impart though, no matter where you live, if you are on the electoral role please exercise your right to vote as there are many who do not have that honour.

I wish all the candidates the very best of luck.  Let canvassing commence!

Dawn